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RFLKT iPhone Powered Bike Computer

Wahoo Fitness RFLKT Bike Computer

Wahoo Fitness RFLKT Bike Computer

If you were to ask me to name my favorite cycling product of all-time, without any hesitation I would tell you about Cyclemeter by Abvio. I’ve used this iPhone app to record my last 20,000 miles or so of cycling. It is the most user-friendly iPhone cycling app you will find and it is easy to customize to suit your needs. It’s not that Cyclemeter is just better than the other cycling GPS apps, but it is so far advanced beyond the other apps that it doesn’t even belong in the same class. In all seriousness, it is worth buying an Apple iPhone if for no other reason than to use this app! I’d rather have the Cyclemeter/iPhone combination than any Garmin computer on the market. This iPhone app is only $4.99 and is available for download via iTunes.

Since I carry my iPhone in my back jersey pocket I am not able to see “real-time” statistics (speed, distance, cadence, heart rate, etc.). As a result, I’ve always had a second bike computer mounted on my handlebars so I could read it as I was cycling. Fortunately, Wahoo Fitness has recently introduced the RFLKT iPhone Powered Bike Computer and it is now one of my top two favorite cycling products of all time!

The RFLKT wirelessly reflects the information that is on your iPhone (hence the name) and displays that information on a compact unit that easily mounts on your handlebars or stem. What makes this bike computer so amazing is that it is completely customizable—you get to choose exactly what is displayed on every screen (and you can create a lot of screens), and you also get to choose the font size (from small to very large).

The RFLKT measures 2.4” long by 1.6” wide by 0.5” thick and weighs only two-ounces. It is powered by a replaceable coin cell battery and the wireless connectivity is made through a Bluetooth 4.0 connection to your iPhone. This computer has several mounting options, including quarter turn, so it is perfect for road bikes, mountain bikes, and cyclocross. I’ve used it in pouring rain and in temps as low as -12F and it hasn’t missed a beat!

The Wahoo Fitness RFLKT Bike Computer retails for $100 and is worth every cent! Wahoo Fitness also has cadence meters and heart rate monitors that tie into the Cyclemeter app (there are other apps available for use with the RFLKT unit, but I’d stick with Cyclemeter).

Note: In the photo above you will notice that my average speed for that bike ride was under 11 MPH. I was riding through 5″ of fresh snow on my Surly Necromancer Pugsley Fat Bike and anything over 8 MPH in deep snow is pretty good!

 
24 Comments

Posted by on February 26, 2014 in Product Reviews

 

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Winter Cycling: Putting It All Together

Note: This is the final installment in a series of articles on winter cycling. I am in the process of converting these articles into a PDF book that you will be able to download for free from this website.

I am often asked about what type of gear I carry with me on winter rides—the answer is not exactly cut and dry. When I am riding in urban areas I don’t carry anything more than I would in the summer. However, the further away from home I ride, or when I am on lonely off-road trails, I usually carry some extra gear. In this article I am going to suggest a few items that you might want to carry with you this winter.

Cell Phone. Going out for a bike ride in the heart of winter can be a beautiful experience—and it can also be deadly if you are not prepared. If you are riding in your neighborhood and your bike experiences a mechanical problem you can just walk it home. However, if you are 30 miles away from civilization when you break down they might not find your body until the snow melts. I carry my Apple iPhone with me on every ride I take—not just so I can call my wife if I break down, but also because there might be a time when I can’t call her at all! I use Abvio Cyclemeter iPhone app to record my rides, and when I am riding in inclement weather I also turn on the Road ID iPhone app so my wife can track me during the ride—she will even get a notification if I crash.

Road ID iPhone App For Cyclists And Runners

Road ID iPhone App

The Road ID iPhone app is very simple to set up and even easier to use. Once you download the app from the iTunes Store you input your basic information (name, address and email address), then you can select up to five of your contacts who will receive either an email or a text message when you are ready to go ride or run. The contacts you selected with get a brief message telling them that you are heading out—and in the message there is a link they can click that will allow them to see exactly where you are at any given moment while you are out (an eCrumb—an electronic breadcrumb). They can watch you on any smart phone or web browser.

The Road ID iPhone app also allows you to turn on a stationary alert—if you don’t move for five minutes the app will send an email or text message to your selected contacts advising them that you are not moving. The message does not necessarily mean that you are lying face-down in a ditch somewhere—it just means that you have not moved more than 15 feet or so in the past five minutes. However, one minute before the text message or email goes out the app will sound a loud alarm to warn you so you can cancel the message. This stationary alert cannot be adjusted to any other time-frame—it is either set at five minutes or it is turned off entirely.

This app will drain your battery a bit, but for most people it is not going to be an issue. I’ve used this app on a lot of short rides (three hours or less). Each time I started with a battery that was 100% full and when I got home after three hours the battery had only gone down by 20%—but I was also running the Abvio Cyclemeter app at the same time (I always turn off the Wi-Fi on my iPhone when heading out for a ride to prolong battery life). One other feature the Road ID iPhone app offers is that it allows you to make a personalized Lock Screen—even if your phone is locked emergency responders can see any pertinent information they need and a list of people they can call in case of an emergency.

According to the description on iTunes, this app is “compatible with iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 5, iPod touch (3rd generation), iPod touch (4th generation), iPod touch (5th generation), and iPad. This app is optimized for iPhone 5. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.”

If you live in an area where cellphone reception is spotty (or even non-existent), you should consider a SPOT Trace device—a small electronics package (2″x3″) that uses satellite technology to track your movements and report your position. These devices start at just $100 (and basic service is just $99 a year).

Cell Phone Cover. Because cold weather will decrease the battery life on your cell phone, it is always best to keep your phone close to your body. Unfortunately, your body produces a tremendous amount of perspiration during winter rides and all of that humidity is often trapped between your body and your outer layer—and your cell phone is trapped between those two layers. You need to store your cell phone in a waterproof cover—a Ziplock bag can work in a pinch, but a more durable option is the Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case for the iPhone 4 or iPhone 5.

Showers Pass CloudCover Dry Wallet For iPhone

Showers Pass CloudCover Dry Wallet For iPhone

The Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case is a weatherproof case with welded edges and a dual zip-lock closure that will keep your phone happy and dry all day long. I have an iPhone 5 and always keep it in a thin polycarbonate case—and even with the case on my phone fits perfectly into the CloudCover case. In addition, the CloudCover case fits into my middle jersey pocket with room to spare. The CloudCover case has a tab on one side so you can attach a key chain or mini-carabiner to it. The case also has reflective piping so if you keep it in your panniers it will be a lot easier to find in low-light. The design of this case also serves to cushion your phone if it should happen to hit the ground.

One of the features I like best about the CloudCover case is that you can still use the iPhone camera without having to take the phone out of the case. I’ve experimented with this option several times and still cannot believe how well it works! As long as you are photographing in bright sunlight it is nearly impossible to tell that the phone was in the case when you took the photo. However, in low-light situations it is easier to tell the difference. Unfortunately, if you attempt the use the flash while taking a photograph the light will bounce off the clear plastic cover and ruin your photo.

Showers Pass also makes CloudCover cases and wallets for several other electronic devices, including: iPad, iPad Mini, Kindles, and a general purpose wallet for smartphones, such as the Samsung Galaxy. The Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case retails for $25 and if you ride in inclement weather that price is a steal! If your local bike shop does not carry this product you can order if it from the Showers Pass website or Amazon.com.

Rubber Gloves: While your chances of getting a flat tire while riding in the snow is fairly low, it is still possible—and if you are not prepared the experience is going to be utterly miserable! I haven’t figured out a way to change a bike tire with winter cycling gloves on, but when you take the gloves off your hands are going to freeze in a matter of minutes. In addition, most winter rides are in the snow which means that the tires are going to be wet when you work on them. Therefore, if I am traveling very far away from home I carry a pair of Ansell HyFlex CR2 Cut Resistant gloves with me. These gloves have a nylon lining and a polyurethane palm coating—they don’t have any insulation, but they will keep you hands dry if you have to change a tire, and they are pliable enough to be easy to work with. If you have a pair of winter glove liners with you they can be worn underneath the HyFlex gloves for a bit of added warmth. While these gloves are fairly thin, if you want something even thinner you could wear a disposable latex glove, like the Microflex Diamond Grip Powder-Free Gloves.

Chemical Hand, Foot And Body Warmers. One of the most useful products I’ve ever bought for winter cycling is also the cheapest—chemical hand, foot and body warmers. Chemical warmers are made by several companies, such as HotHands and Grabber. Though the exact ingredients in these warmers vary depending on the manufacturer, they all basically have the same ingredients: Iron powder, salt, water, activated charcoal and vermiculite (or cellulose). To activate these chemical warmers all you have to do is expose them to air by removing them for their packaging (sometimes you have to shake the packs for a few seconds). Once out of the package these products warm up in 15 to 30 minutes and can stay warm for four or five hours. These products are almost always advertised as being good for seven or eight hours, and under ideal circumstances they might, but that has not been my experience with most of them. Please check the expiration date on the packages before you buy them! When these warmers get old they don’t produce much heat (if any).

Chemical Hand, Foot and Body Warmers for winter cycling

Chemical Hand, Foot and Body Warmers

Chemical hand warmers are the most common type of warmer you will see at Walmart, Target and sporting good stores. They come in packages of two and each warmer measures about 2″x3″. Chemical body warmers are larger than hand warmers—they measure 4″x5.5″, and the Super HotHands Body Warmer keeps working for up to 18 hours!

Miscellaneous Items: I always a carry a container of ChapStick with me on winter rides—the cold, dry air makes my lips burn and chap. In addition, a couple of extra carb gels or energy bars are not a bad idea if you are riding very far away from home (you can burn a lot of calories while walking your bike home).

One of my favorite off-road winter rides is on the Des Plaines River Trail in Lake County, Illinois. As the name suggests, the trail runs next to the Des Plaines River, and sometimes when the river is high I’m riding just a few inches from the water. I’ve never fallen into the water, but one slip of a tire could really ruin my day. So, when the river is high and there is a chance of taking an unintentional dip in the water, I carry a disposable SOL Emergency Blanket. This 56” x 84″ emergency warming blanket reflects 90% of your body heat, yet it only weighs 2.5 ounces and doesn’t take up much more room than a Clif Bar. I haven’t had to use it yet and I pray that I never do!

One Final Item: Don’t ever go out for a bike ride without your Road ID or your driver’s license. If you have an accident the emergency responders need to know how to get in touch with your family. In addition, if you are riding when the temperature is -20 Fahrenheit (-29 Celsius) sometimes you have to look at your driver’s license just so you can remember your gender.

If you are an avid winter cyclist please feel free to tell me what you think I missed on this list.

 
33 Comments

Posted by on November 24, 2013 in Fat Bikes, Winter Cycling

 

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AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

A few months ago I reviewed the AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones and declared it to be “the coolest gadget I’ve bought this year!” Shortly after the review was published the folks at AfterShockz sent me a note and suggested that I ought to try their new Bluetooth version of these headphones, the AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones. Once I found out there was a Bluetooth version available I immediately ordered a pair from Amazon.com and I am certainly glad I did!

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

Like the Sportz M2 wired headphone, the AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones uses bone conduction technology so you are listening through your cheekbones—the headphones sit in front of your ears, not in them. The sound quality is amazing and you can ride your bike while listening to your favorite music and still hear ambient noises. I use these headphones with an Apple iPhone 5, but they are also compatible with most other phones and Bluetooth devices.

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

On/Off Switch and USB Charging Port

The AfterShockz Bluez are wireless headphones and they connect to your smartphone or iPod with Bluetooth technology—and you can still make or take phone calls while they are on. The unit is powered by a built-in rechargeable battery that provides about 10 to 12 hours of use between charges. You can recharge the battery by plugging the device into the USB port on your computer (a USB cord in included with the headphones).

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

The Headphones Sit In Front Of Your Ears—Not In Them

The biggest questions most cyclists are going to have about this device is how they handle on off-road trails and if you can wear them with your helmet on. I’ve had no problems with these headphones staying in place on rough off-road trails, and I always wear my helmet and sunglasses when I ride.

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones

AfterShockz claims that the range on this device is about 33 feet (10 meters) and that has been my experience as well. While working on my bikes in the garage I usually wear the AfterShockz Bluez so I can walk around while I listen to music and still be able to make a phone call when needed. This unit is water-resistant, but not water-proof (you can probably safely ride your bike in the rain with these on, but don’t take them swimming).

While I dearly love this set of headphones they are not perfect. The first time I took them out on an off-road trail I rode for over 60 miles without any problem. However, the second time I tried them there was electrical interference that drove me crazy until I finally figured out that the problem was coming from the key fob for my Jeep Grand Cherokee (it uses Near Field Technology and obviously does not behave well when it is anywhere near the headphones). I’ve also had a problem a few times when I had to stop my bike at an intersection near to a traffic control box (electrical interference again).

The AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones retail for $120, but you can find them on Amazon.com for around $85.

I know what you are really asking yourself right now: What does the All Seasons Cyclist listen to when he is riding his bike? Well, I am decidedly old-school when it comes to music. My iPhone has an eclectic collection of over 5,000 songs that includes artists such as Johnny Cash, Air Supply, The Beatles, The Byrds, Clannad, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Elvis Presley, Loreena McKennit, Norah Jones, and Toby Keith—as well as the U.S. Army Band & Chorus and the United States Military Academy Cadet Glee Club. When I am racing against the clock I like to listen to cadences from the United States Marine Corps (courtesy of my sons). If you can’t reach your top speed with a Marine Corps Drill Instructor screaming in your ears, well, there is no hope for you!

 
30 Comments

Posted by on September 20, 2013 in Product Reviews

 

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Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case

I take my iPhone with me on every ride—in rain, snow, mud, sand or beautiful sunshine. There are several good phone cases on the marker that will keep your iPhone dry while you are riding (or running for that matter), but the best case I’ve found so far is the Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case for the iPhone 4 or iPhone 5.

Showers Pass CloudCover Dry Wallet For iPhone

Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case

The Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case is a weatherproof case with welded edges and a dual zip-lock closure that will keep your phone happy and dry all day long. I have an iPhone 5 and always keep it in a thin polycarbonate case—and even with the case on my phone fits perfectly into the CloudCover case. In addition, the CloudCover case fits into my middle jersey pocket with room to spare.

Easy Open Dual Zip-lock Closure

Easy Open Dual Zip-lock Closure

The CloudCover case has a tab on one side so you can attach a key chain or mini-carabiner to it. The case also has reflective piping so if you keep it in your panniers it will be a lot easier to find in low-light. The design of this case also serves to cushion your phone if it should happen to hit the ground.

You Can Take Photos Through The Clear Cover

You Can Take Photos Through The Clear Cover

One of the features I like best about the CloudCover case is that you can still use the iPhone camera without having to take the phone out of the case. I’ve experimented with this option several times and still cannot believe how well it works! As long as you are photographing in bright sunlight it is nearly impossible to tell that the phone was in the case when you took the photo. However, in low-light situations it is easier to tell the difference. Unfortunately, if you attempt the use the flash while taking a photograph the light will bounce off the clear plastic cover and ruin your photo. One other note: if you have the iPhone 5 you will need to remove whatever protective case you have before you put it in this case or the phone will sit too high in the case to take a picture.

Showers Pass also makes CloudCover cases and wallets for several other electronic devices, including: iPad, iPad Mini, Kindles, and a general purpose wallet for smartphones, such as the Samsung Galaxy. While the iPhone case and the generic smartphone case are available in either black or silver, the other cases only come in black.

The Showers Pass CloudCover iPhone Case retails for $25 and if you ride in inclement weather that price is a steal! If your local bike shop does not carry this product you can order if it from the Showers Pass website or Amazon.com.

 

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BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder (Product Review and Giveaway)

The main reason I own an Apple iPhone is because I am a distance cyclist and I try to travel as light as possible. The iPhone allows me to record my workouts with the Cyclemeter App (my absolute favorite app for the iPhone) and it allows my wife to track me with the new Road ID App (my second favorite app). I also take photos on off-road trails and always use the iPhone to check on the weather before I leave the house. On rare occasions I have actually used the iPhone to make a phone call. However, carrying a smartphone is sometimes a challenge because I don’t want to permanently mount a phone holder to any of my bikes. A few weeks ago the folks at Alt-Gear sent me a BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder to review and it is probably the best smartphone holder for cyclists available on the market today. If you would like a chance to win this smartphone holder just keep reading!

BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder

BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder

The BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder is made of urethane and is highly water-resistant (in my opinion your phone is safe in a thunderstorm, but don’t use this holder when you go scuba diving). The sealed construction on this holder makes for a very durable phone case. This holder mounts to your bike with a sturdy Velrco strip—you can attach it to either your handlebars or the handlebar stem. While the Velcro is very secure it is still easy to remove it when you want to.

The clear window on the back allows you to still use your camera

The clear window on the back allows you to still use your camera

Unlike most of the other iPhone (or other smartphone) holders on the market, this one has a clear window on the back so you can use your camera with having to take the phone out of the holder. I shot a few photos through this window and was pleasantly surprised at how well the photos looked! Photos shot in full daylight were nearly perfect, but I could see a bit of blurring in low-light situations. Another surprising thing about this smartphone holder is that you can still use your phone when it is in the case—the sound is slightly muffled, but still good enough to use.

BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder

BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder

By the way, I keep my iPhone 5 in a very thin polypropylene case and it fits in the DriKase holder with ease. This case will also hold a Samsung Galaxy 3 or 4 and several other smartphones. BiKase also has holders available that will accommodate larger phones and even an iPad Mini or Kindle. The BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder retails for $25 and is available from the Alt-Gear website , CambriaBike.com, OutsideOutfitters.com, and Amazon.com.

Regular readers know that I seldom keep the products that are sent to me for review. If you would like a chance  to win this BiKase DriKase Smartphone Holder then leave a comment below telling me why you need it. The contest ends at midnight (CST) on Friday, August 23, 2013. After the contest closes I will read through the comments and choose a winner based solely on my subjective mood at the time. I won’t respond to the comments left below, but I promise to read and consider every one of them. This contest is for U.S. residents only and only one entry per household allowed. I will send this product to the winner via U.S. Mail at my expense. Good luck!

 
15 Comments

Posted by on August 20, 2013 in Product Reviews

 

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Road ID iPhone App For Cyclists And Runners

As I was watching the Tour de France last week I saw an interview with Edward Wimmer, one of the co-owners of Road ID (the most essential piece of cycling gear I own). During the interview Wimmer mentioned that Road ID had recently introduced a free iPhone app that would allow your friends or family to track you while you are out on a ride or going for a run. I downloaded the app this past Monday and it has quickly become one of the most important apps on my iPhone!

Road ID iPhone App For Cyclists And Runners

Road ID iPhone App

The Road ID iPhone app is very simple to set up and even easier to use. Once you download the app from the iTunes Store you input your basic information (name, address and email address), then you can select up to five of your contacts who will receive either an email or a text message when you are ready to go ride or run. The contacts you selected with get a brief message telling them that you are going out—and in the message there is a link they can click that will allow them to see exactly where you are at any given moment while you are out (Road ID calls this an eCrumb—an electronic breadcrumb). They can watch you on any smart phone or web browser.

Road ID iPhone App For Cyclists And Runners

Road ID iPhone App Stationary Alert

The Road ID iPhone app also allows you to turn on a stationary alert—if you don’t move for five minutes the app will send an email or text message to your selected contacts warning them that you are not moving. The message does not necessarily mean that you are lying face-down in a ditch somewhere—it just means that you have not moved more than 15 feet or so in the past five minutes. However, one minute before the text message or email goes out the app will sound a loud alarm to warn you so you can cancel the message (the alarm reminds me of a klaxon horn from a WWII battleship). At the moment this stationary alert cannot be adjusted to any other time-frame—it is either set at five minutes or it is turned off entirely. I wish this app offered the ability to change the amount of time before sending the stationary alert because five minutes is not a lot of time if you get stuck behind a few customers buying lottery tickets at the convenience store (personally, I think the lottery is just a tax on people who are really bad at math).

One of the biggest concerns most people are going to have about this app is the impact on the battery life of your iPhone. There is no question that it will drain your battery a bit, but for most people this is not going to be an issue. I’ve gone out for three rides of three hours each (including “standing around” time at stop lights, etc.) and each time I started with a battery that was 100% full. When I got home after three hours the battery had only gone down by 20%—but I was running another app, Abvio Cyclemeter, at the same time! One note: I always turn off the Wi-Fi on my iPhone when heading out for a ride to prolong battery life.

One other feature  the Road ID iPhone app offers is that it allows you to make a personalized Lock Screen—even if your phone is locked emergency responders can see any pertinent information they need and a list of people they can call in case of an emergency.

The Road ID iPhone app just hit the iTunes store on June 13, 2013 and it is still in version 1.0 as of this writing. According to the description on the iTunes store, this app is “compatible with iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 5, iPod touch (3rd generation), iPod touch (4th generation), iPod touch (5th generation), and iPad. This app is optimized for iPhone 5. Requires iOS 5.0 or later.”

As I said earlier, this is one of my favorite apps—I wish it had been available with my sons were teenagers (what parent wouldn’t want to be able to track their kids?).

 
77 Comments

Posted by on July 26, 2013 in Product Reviews

 

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AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones with Microphone

Listen up ladies and gentlemen—I am going to tell you about the coolest gadget I’ve bought this year! I love listening to music when I am riding my bike, especially on long rides. However, wearing headphones in both ears while riding on the road is banned in most states. A few years ago I bought a new pair of Apple EarBuds and cut off one of the ear pieces so I could ride legally (obviously, I kept the side that has the microphone on it). While the modified Earbuds worked, they were far from perfect—the sound quality wasn’t all that great. A few months ago I bought a pair of AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones and they are simply awesome—now I can ride my bike, listen to my music and still hear ambient noises.

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones sit in front of your ears, not in them. They use bone conduction technology so you are basically listening through your cheekbones! The sound quality is better than any headphone I’ve ever tried before and since there is nothing in your ears you can still hear ambient noises (cars, horns, motorcycles, rabid dogs and riding partners).

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones

Wear the unit in front of your ears

These headphones also have an in-line microphone that allows your to take or make phone calls—and the sound quality here is also flawless. The microphone is contained in small box (2″ x .75″ x .5″) that can easily clip onto your jacket or cycling jersey. The microphone box also houses the on/off switch, volume control, call button and a micro-USB port for charging the built-in lithium battery. You can charge this unit by plugging it into the USB port on almost any computer, or by connecting it to the same charger you use for your iPhone or iPod (or most other USB chargers).

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones

Control box with microphone, volume buttons, call button and charging port

The headphone unit comes with a sturdy carrying case, USB charging cables, instruction manual, and a 5mm connector (which you probably won’t need unless your phone case has a high-profile). I am able to get about 10 to 12 hours of use between charges. This unit is water-resistant, but not water proof (you can probably safely ride your bike in the rain with these on, but don’t take them swimming). This headphone is also great for skateboarding, hiking, and skiing. I’ve not had any problems using this headphone, even when wearing sunglasses and a bike helmet.

AfterShokz Sportz M2 Open Ear Sport Headphones

Comes with a carrying case, charging cord, extension cord and instruction manual

The AfterShokz Sportz M2 AS321 Open Ear Sport Headphones with Microphone retail for around $80 ($60 on Amazon.com) and they are one of the best investments you can make if you like riding your bike while listening to music. AfterShokz has recently introduced a Bluetooth pair of headphones, the AfterShokz Bluez Open Ear Bluetooth Wireless Headphones. The Bluetooth model retails for around $120 and the microphone is positioned near the left transducer. I have ordered a pair of the Bluetooth headphones from an Amazon.com retailer, but they have not yet arrived (I will post a review of them later).

 

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